• The KANA Kuta Hotel Bali, Indonesia

The KANA Kuta Hotel - Blog

2016


  • Pulau Menjangan

    Menjangan Island is a small island, located 5 miles to the north-west of Bali island
    and is part of the Indonesian archipelago. “Menjangan” in Indonesian means “Deer”. The name was given by the local population observing wild deer herds swimming to the island every spring and covering a distance of approx 1.2 miles.

    Even though the island is a significant part of Bali Barat National Park, it is assigned
    to the Javanese administrative district and falls under its jurisdiction. The closest
    big cities are: Singaraja, located in the north of Bali and Banyuwangi, located
    on the eastern coast of Java. The closest settlement is Sumberkima village. The nearest airport is Letkol Wisnu regional (approx. 8 miles from the island).

    The island is considered to be an important part of the local tourism industry, because its marine fauna incorporates one of the best-preserved coral reefs in the area.
    All scuba-diving shops arrange daily trips to the island.


  • Sangeh Monkey Forest

    The Ubud Monkey Forest is a nature reserve and Hindu temple complex in Ubud, Bali, Indonesia. Its official name is the Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary (Balinese Mandala Suci Wenara Wana), and its name as written on its welcome sign is the Padangtegal Mandala Wisata Wanara Wana Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary. The Ubud Monkey Forest is a popular tourist attraction and is often visited by over 10,000 tourists a month.

    The Monkey Forest lies within the village of Padangtegal, which owns it. The village’s residents view
    the Monkey Forest as an important spiritual, economic, educational, and conservation center for the village.

    The Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary (Ubud Monkey Forest) is not just a tourist attractions or important component in the spiritual and economic life of the local community, but also an important spot for research and conservation programs.

    The special management and arrangement that have been done in this area encouraged researchers from various research institutions around the world to conduct a research, particularly on the monkey’s social interaction and behavior with their surrounding environment.

    The special management and arrangement that have been done in this area encouraged researchers from various research institutions around the world to conduct a research, particularly on the monkey’s social interaction and behavior with their surrounding environment.


  • Tanah Lot

    Tanah Lot is a rock formation off the Indonesian island of Bali. It is home to the pilgrimage temple
    Pura Tanah Lot (literally “Tanah Lot temple”), a popular tourist and cultural icon for photography and general
    exoticism.

    Tanah Lot means “Land [sic: in the] Sea” in the Balinese language. Located in Tabanan, about 20 kilometres
    (12 mi) from Denpasar, the temple sits on a large offshore rock which has been shaped continuously over
    the years by the ocean tide.

    Tanah Lot is claimed to be the work of the 16th-century Dang Hyang Nirartha. During his travels along
    the south coast he saw the rock-island’s beautiful setting and rested there. Some fishermen saw him,
    and bought him gifts. Nirartha then spent the night on the little island. Later he spoke to the fishermen and told them to build a shrine on the rock, for he felt it to be a holy place to worship the Balinese sea gods.

    The main deity of the temple is Dewa Baruna or Bhatara Segara, who is the sea god or sea power
    andthese days, Nirartha is also worshipped here.

    The Tanah Lot temple was built and has been a part of Balinese mythology for centuries. The temple is one
    of seven sea temples around the Balinese coast. Each of the sea temples was established within eyesight
    of the next to form a chain along the south-western coast. In addition to Balinese mythology,
    the temple was significantly influenced by Hinduism.

    At the base of the rocky island, venomous sea snakes are believed to guard the temple from evil spirits
    and intruders. The temple is purportedly protected by a giant snake, which was created from Nirartha’s
    selendang (a type of sash) when he established the island.

  • Tirta Gangga

    Tirta Gangga is a former royal palace in eastern Bali, Indonesia, about 5 kilometres from Karangasem, near Abang. It is noted for its water palace, owned by Karangasem Royal.

    Tirta Gangga literally means water from the Ganges and it is a site of some reverence for the Hindu Balinese. Strictly, the name refers to the water palace built in 1948 by the Raja of Karangasem, Anak Agung Agung Anglurah Ketut Karangasem. It is, however, the name widely used to refer to the general area which includes the water palace and the lush rural areas around. Tirta Gangga water palace is a maze of pools and fountains surrounded by a lush garden and stone carvings and statues. The one hectare complex was built in 1946 by the late King of Karangsem but was destroyed almost entirely by the eruption of nearby Mount Agung in 1963. It has been lovingly re-built and restored and has an air of authentic royal magnificence.

    The centrepiece of the palace is an eleven tiered fountain and there are many beautiful carvings and statues adorning the gardens. The area around Tirta Gangga is noted for its rice paddy terraces.

  • Rafting

    Rafting and white water rafting are recreational outdoor activities which use an inflatable raft to navigate a river or other body of water. This is often done on whitewater or different degrees of rough water, and generally represents a new and challenging environment for participants. Dealing with risk and the need for teamwork is often a part of the experience. The development of this activity as a leisure sport has become popular since the mid-1970s, evolving from individuals paddling 10 feet (3.0 m) rafts with double-bladed paddles to multi-person rafts propelled by single-bladed paddles and steered by a tour guide at the stern. It is considered an extreme sport, and can be fatal. The International Rafting Federation (IRF) is the worldwide body which oversees all aspects of the sport.

    Otherwise known as the International Scale of River Difficulty, below are the six grades of difficulty in white water rafting. They range from simple to very dangerous and potential death or serious injuries.

    Class 1: Very small rough areas, might require slight maneuvering. (Skill level: very basic)

    Class 2: Some rough water, maybe some rocks, might require some maneuvering. (Skill level: basic paddling skill)

    Class 3: Whitewater, small waves, maybe a small drop, but no considerable danger. May require significant maneuvering.

    Class 4: Whitewater, medium waves, maybe rocks, maybe a considerable drop, sharp maneuvers may be needed.

    Class 5: Whitewater, large waves, large volume, possibility of large rocks and hazards, possibility of a large drop, requires precise maneuvering.

    Class 6: Class 6 rapids are considered to be so dangerous that they are effectively unnavigable on a reliably safe basis.Rafters can expect to encounter substantial whitewater, huge waves, huge rocks and hazards, and/or substantial drops that will impart severe impacts beyond the structural capacities and impact ratings of almost all rafting equipment. Traversing a Class 6 rapid has a dramatically increased likelihood of ending in serious injury or death compared to lesser classes.


  • Tirta Empul

    Tirta Empul is an important temple complex and holy mountain spring, located in the village of Manukaya in central Bali. The site serves as a legendary setting of a traditional tale about good versus evil. It is also a national cultural heritage site.

    The complex, built circa 960 AD, is also a silent witness to the old Balinese kingdom years, particularly at the time of the Warmadewa Dynasty. Another nearby and prominent site on top of a hill is the presidential palace, Istana Tampaksiring, built during the years of the nation’s first president, Soekarno.

    Tirta Empul, meaning ‘holy water spring’ is actually the name of a water source located within the temple. The spring feeds various purification baths, pools and fish ponds surrounding the outer perimeter, which all flow to the Tukad Pakerisan River. Various sites throughout the region and many other archaeological relics relate to local myths and legends.

    As is common with Balinese temples, the Tirta Empul Temple complex has three key divisions, namely a front, secondary and inner courtyard. Visitors to Tirta Empul first come upon the lush gardens and pathways adorned with statues and tropical plants that lead to its entrance. After stepping through this typical ‘candi bentar’ (temple gate), a vast walled courtyard welcomes visitors to the bathing pools where a large ‘wantilan’ meeting hall stands at the right.

    Inside the central courtyard, referred to as ‘madya mandala’ or ‘jaba tengah’, pilgrims first approach a rectangular purification bath where a total of 13 elaborately sculpted spouts that line the edge from west to east. After solemn prayers at an altar-like shrine, they proceed to enter the crystal-clear, cold mountain water. With hands pressed together, they bow under the gushing water of the first spout, carrying on to the eleventh. The water from the last two of the 13 spouts is meant for purification purposes in funerary rites.

    The myth behind the curative and purifying spring tells of a Balinese ruler, known by the title Mayadenawa, who is depicted to have defied the influence of Hinduism and denied his subjects religious prayers and practices. The legend goes that this eventually angered the gods, and in a campaign, god Indra sought Mayadenawa’s subdual.


2015


  • Balinese Food

    Uluwatu is a place on the south-western tip of the Bukit Peninsula of Bali, Indonesia. It is home to the Pura Luhur Uluwatu Temple and is the number four surf destination in the world for surfers of all abilities.

    The name Uluwatu comes from ulu, meaning ‘lands end’, and watu, meaning ‘rockVisible in the Bukit Peninsula are layers of tertiary limestone resulting from the tectonic subduction of the Indo-Australian Plate under the Eurasian Plate, bringing it above sea level.Uluwatu borders the Indian Ocean to the south.

    Uluwatu was “discovered” as a surfing destination in 1972, due to the making of Morning of the Earth, a 1971 classic surf film by Alby Falzon and David Elfick.The original goal of the film was to show waves around Kuta.

    After a few days of shooting around Kuta beach, they found Uluwatu. To get to Uluwatu requires descending down the temple and emerging through the two rocks at the base of the cave, at the beach of Uluwatu. At the time, there were no roads leading to the beach, which meant that surfers had to bring all the supplies they would need Steve Cooney surfed the first wave in Uluwatu history, capturing it on film for the movie Morning of the Earth at age 15.After the movie’s release on25 February 1972. Uluwatu received immediate attention from surfers across the globe.


  • Diving in Bali

    Diving in Bali has some fine diving in Jemeluk Bay both from the beach and from boats in deeper water. After a gentle slope out from shore, the wall here drops off dramatically to depths of 40 m plus. The coral is healthy and fish life abundant. There are some good drift dives further east at Selang and Bunutan but these are generally only suited to more experienced divers.

    Beware of diving after a heavy rain, the water from the run-off can greatly reduce visibility in the water. Amed and Tulamben are fast becoming recognised as the best place in Bali to learn freediving (apnea or breath-hold diving). Two Freediving schools are located in Amed (Apneista) and Tulamben plus several other instructors use those locations for providing courses. Jemeluk bay in Amed has deep coral walls and a lack of strong currents. Based there is the Apneista Freediving training .In Tulamben, closeby the famous Liberty wreck and with easy access to depth of 150m+, Apnea Bali is located.

    All levels are welcome, ranging from beginners to freedive athletes training for competitions. The school offers Apnea Total and SSI certified courses. Those that have a bit more time can sign up for their master program, which is an intensive, personalised training over 4-5 weeks. The team at Apnea Bali also does coaching, competition preparation and depth training on their freedive platform out in the bay. The main goal at the school isn’t the certification card at the end of the course, but to enjoy being in the water and develop everyone’s individual skills.

  • Surfing in Bali

    Bali is one of the best surfing destinations in the world for both beginners and the experienced. The vast choice of surf breaks in Bali means, there is a wave for everyone.Balinese are welcoming, friendly and easy going, so you won’t have a hard time surfing,whatever your ability.

    A vibrant culture, nice beaches, warm water, great waves all year around and one of the cheapest destinations to surf gives Bali the edge.The famous surfing points in Bali has been able to lure the surfers to take a part of this adventurewith a wide selection of the great wave and beautiful beaches.

    These surf points spread across fromthe east coast to the west of the island and all are situated in south part of Bali Island such asUluwatu beach, Suluban, Balangan, Keramas, Padang padang stc.Surfing is good all year around. The west coast, where most of the beach breaks are, is best between April and October when predominantly off shore wind makes it most perfect for surfing.

    Between mid November and early March the East coast becomes more favorable, however the reef breaks found here is better left for more experienced surfers.Note however that the rain season is between December and March. This can make surfing a little unpredictable during particular days. Water temperature is nice and warm all year round hovering between 21C – 25C


  • Galungan

    Galungan is a Balinese holiday celebrating the victory of dharma over adharma. It marks the time when the ancestral spirits visit the Earth. The last day of the celebration is Kuningan, when they return. The date is calculated according to the 210-day Balinese calendar.

    Galungan marks the beginning of the most important recurring religious ceremonies.
    The spirits of deceased relatives who have died and been cremated return to visit their former homes, and the current inhabitants have a responsibility to be hospitable through prayers and offerings.

    The most obvious sign of the celebrations are the penjor – bamboo poles with offerings suspended at the end. These are installed by the side of roads. A number of days around the Kuningan day have special names, and are marked by the organization of particular activitie.

  • Gili Trawangan

    Is the largest of Lombok’s Gili Islands and the only one to rise significantly (30 m) above sea level. Measuring 3 km long and 2 km wide, it has a population of around 1500 (see demography). The name Trawangan originates from the Indonesian word Terowongan (Tunnel) due to the presence of a cave tunnel built there during Japanese occupation in World War 2. Of the Gilis, Trawangan is the most developed and geared towards tourism.

    The main concentration of settlement, recreation, accommodation and diving business is situated on the eastern side of the island. A local pub, Tîr na Nôg claims that Trawangan is the smallest island in the world with an Irish pub. It was previously administered under Lombok Barat Regency along with Senggigi until 2010 when the Gili islands came under the jurisdiction of the new North Lombok Regency (Kabupaten Lombok Utara).

    On Gili Trawangan (as well as the other two Gilis), there are no motorised vehicles. The main means of transportation are bicycles (rented by locals to tourists) and cidomo (a small horse-drawn carriage). For travelling to and from each of the Gilis, locals usually use motorised boats and speedboats.

    Some of the first inhabitants of Gili Trawangan were fishermen and farmers from Sulawesi. Previous to human settlement Gili Trawangan was covered in forest and deer lived on the island. (Source: Inhabitants of Gili Trawangan — no printed source available).[verification needed]

    The economy of Gili Trawangan centres on tourism, as the island is too small to support any broad scale agriculture, and too remote to allow economically viable industry or commerce. There is a mosque on the island.

    Gili Trawangan has had a reputation since the 1980s as a location where drugs are freely available. Psilocybin mushrooms are openly advertised on the island, and a range of harder drugs have been known to be in circulation. Though police presence is low, Indonesian drug laws are extremely harsh and thus strictly speaking drug possession and use is prohibited and carries potentially grave risk (up to and including the death penalty).

  • G land

    G-Land, also known as Plengkung Beach, is an internationally renowned surf break situated on the Grajagan Bay, Alas Purwo National Park, East Java, Indonesia about half a day by road from the popular tourist destinations of Bali. G-Land is most commonly reached via boat charter from Bali.

    In 1972, a core group of American surfers organized the first expedition to G-Land. A group of three surfers had to carry all their supplies and boards. Another group of 5 surfers went by local transport overland, arrived in Grajagan village near the river mouth and had to walk about 20 km along the beach with their boards. The first group sailed into G-Land and beached the boat, which was their base camp for the next 10 days. They had very little fresh water and would have to collect it off the sails when it rained.

    Soon after the discovery, Mike Boyum helped set up the first surf camp at G-Land, which was possibly the start of the surf camp concept that has since spread across the globe. Balinese surfer Boby Radiasa took over the operation in the late 70s and still runs it today. From the days of the original Boyum/Bobby’s camp other camps have opened at G-Land offering various standards of accommodation and facilities to suit a range of holiday budgets, with G-Land Bobby’s Surf Camp – info at www.grajagan.com. there’s another surfcamp in the jungle in front of Speedies Reef named Joyo’s Surf Camp, info www.g-land.com. The third Surf Camp, located closest to the only viewing tower and the peddle out point, is G-land Surf Camp (www.g-landsurfcamp.com).


  • Kecak Dance

    Kecak (pronounced [ˈketʃaʔ], alternate spellings: Ketjak and Ketjack) is a form of Balinese dance and music drama that was developed in the 1930s in Bali, Indonesia. Since its creation, it has been performed primarily by men, with the very first women’s kecak group starting in 2006.

    Also known as the Ramayana Monkey Chant, the piece, performed by a circle of at least 150 performers wearing checked cloth around their waists, percussively chanting “cak” and moving their hands and arms, depicts a battle from the Ramayana. The monkey-like Vanara helped Prince Rama fight the evil King Ravana. Kecak has roots in sanghyang, a trance-inducing exorcism dance.

    Kecak was originally a trance ritual accompanied by male chorus. In the 1930s, Walter Spies, a German painter and musician, became deeply interested in the ritual while living in Bali. He adapted it as a drama, based on the Hindu Ramayana and including dance, intended for performance before Western tourist audiences.

    This is an example of what James Clifford describes as part of the “modern art-culture system” in which, “the West or the central power adopts, transforms, and consumes non-Western or peripheral cultural elements, while making ‘art,’ which was once embedded in the culture as a whole, into a separate entity.” Spies worked with Wayan Limbak, who popularized the dance by arranging for performances by Balinese groups touring internationally. These tours have helped make the kecak internationally known.


  • Nusa Lembongan

    Nusa Lembongan is approximately 8 square kilometres in size with a permanent population estimated at 5,000. Twelve kilometres of the Badung Strait separates Nusa Lembongan from Bali Island. The island is surrounded by coral reefs with white sand beaches and low limestone cliffs.

    Nusa Lembongan is separated from Nusa Ceningan by a shallow estuarine channel which is difficult to navigate at low tide. There is a suspension bridge linking Nusa Lembongan and Nusa Ceningan and this takes foot and motorbike traffic only. There are no permanent waterways on Nusa Lembongan.

    There are three main villages on the island. Jungut Batu and Mushroom Bay are the centres of the tourist-based industry and activities on the island whilst much of the permanent local population resides in Lembongan Village. To the east, the Lombok Strait separates the three islands from Lombok, and marks the biogeographical division between the fauna of the Indomalayan ecozone and the distinctly different fauna of Australasia.

    The transition is known as the Wallace Line, named after Alfred Russel Wallace, who first proposed a transition zone between these two major biomes. The north-eastern side of the island is flanked by a relatively large area of mangroves totalling some 212 hectares.


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